Developer’s Life – Every Developer is a Chhota Bheem

Chhota Bheem is a cartoon character that is extremely popular where I live.  He is my daughter’s favorite characters.  I like to say that children love Chhota Bheem more than their parents – it is lucky for us he is not real! 

Children love Chhota Bheem because he is the absolute “good guy.”  He is smart, loyal, and strong.  He and his friends live in Dholakpur and fight off their many enemies – and always win – in every episode.  In each episode, they learn something about friendship, bravery, and being kind to others.  Chhota Bheem is a good role model for children, and I think that he is a good role model for developers are well.

So How are Developers like Chhota Bheem?

Well, read on my list of reasons.

Use Brain Cells

Chhota Bheem uses his brain.  He doesn’t always win his fights using strength, he also outsmarts his enemies.  Problems at work may not be “enemies,” but developers still must use their brain to solve networking or server issues.

No Jealousy

Chhota Bheem doesn’t give in to jealousy.  Sometimes his enemies try to turn him and his friends against each other, but they never give in.  Developers also must work in a team, so don’t let jealousy get in your way!

Optimizing Resources

Use your resources.  Chhota Bheem’s rival Kalia Pehelwan has powers, but because he does not use them properly, he always loses to Chhota.  Developers don’t have the same kind of powers as Kalia, but it is always important to try your best.

Great Personal Character

Chhota Bheem often wins because he is kind, courteous, and respectful, when those he are fighting are not.  It can be hard to remember that the good will always win (yes, even in the real world), and while I would never suggest that developers are bad guys, sometimes the stress of the job can make kindness hard.  Be like Chhota Bheem – try your best.

Play Fair

Play fair.  Chhota Bheem also wins against his enemies because he follows the rules.  In the show, the challenges are often set up like a game or contest.  Chhota wins because he plays by the rules, even when his enemies cheat.  In the work place, there are not always “rules” like a game, but it can be tempting to work too quickly, or not finish a project.  Whatever the temptation may be – going home early, outdoing a colleague – remember that that results will not be worth it.

Self Confident

Chhota Bheem has self-confidence.  He may just be a child leader (partially for the sake of his audience) but he is not afraid to lead his friends and fight his enemies.  Next time you are at work and there is a project that seems impossible, take courage from Chhota Bheem.  He is a child, and children love him.  Children might not quite understand your job, but you, too, can inspire awe like Chhota Bheem.

I hope you are all enjoying reading about developers-as-superheroes as much as I am enjoying writing about them.  Please tell me how else developers are like Superheroes in the comments – especially if you know any developers who are faster than a speeding bullet and can leap tall buildings in a single bound.

Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com)

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7 thoughts on “Developer’s Life – Every Developer is a Chhota Bheem

  1. Hahah nice one pinal but i really pity todays generation that they dont have much of cartoons to watch and have fun. Cartoon network have plummeted deep with lots of innovative characters behind, but it feels great that indian daitey has turned into hero which next generation is really mad for.

    • I agree that it seems the best cartoons have been left behind. In fact, I think the majority of what my kids like is junk. How much of that is really that the cartoons have deteriorated in quality, though, and how much that we have become grumpy old men idealizing nostalgia for things that weren’t necessarily better, but were ours in a different time?

  2. Pinal, I’m hearing one thing in this post – it is encouraging virtue. I think people generally go a little too far with the emphasis on kindness and needing to be selfless all the time – it’s important to take care of oneself and you always need to make sure your situation is in your best interests and it’s not healthy to think only of others – but sensitivity, courtesy, and decorum make life better for everyone involved. I really like what you are saying here. Honesty and openness and delivering value to others in exchange for receiving value yourself – always making sure that your relationships in work and more broadly in your life are mutually beneficial rather than having one who gives and one who takes – helps you sleep better at night comfortable with yourself and your actions and ultimately yields better results. I have never viewed Chhota Bheem myself, but as you describe him, it sounds like a positive message. Thank you for another post that delivers value to your readers.

  3. In the US, we have Dora the Explorer. My kids are too old now to like her anymore, but they used to watch all the time. There are a lot of things I didn’t like about the show and cartoons have a lot in common with the mainstream of society today – an unwillingness to face any of the realities of the world and an effort to cover it up with a phony “niceness” in place of real courtesy So much of what I see is whining and appeals to authority rather than people dealing with their own problems. What I always liked, though, about Dora, that you have also pointed out about Chhota Bheem, was her confidence. There was never any hesitation or any fear for her to take on an adventure. She just did things and took on challenges. In the face of injustice, with whiners all around her, she just took action. It was great how she didn’t let anything get in her way. It was a great message for kids, especially for girls.

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