SQL SERVER – Database Coding Standards and Guidelines Complete List Download

Download SQL SERVER Database Coding Standards and Guidelines Complete List

Just like my previous series of SQL Server Interview Questions and Answers Complete List Download, I have received many comments and emails regarding this series. Once I go through all the emails and comments, I will make a summary of them and integrate them with my series. I have also received emails asking me to create PDF for download. I have created that as well. Please feel free to download it and use it.

Please ask me any questions you might have. Contact me if you are interested in writing a mini series with me.

Download SQL SERVER Database Coding Standards and Guidelines Complete List

Complete Series of Database Coding Standards and Guidelines
SQL SERVER Coding Standards and Guidelines – Introduction
SQL SERVER – Coding Standards and Guidelines – Part 1
SQL SERVER – Coding Standards and Guidelines – Part 2
SQL SERVER Coding Standards and Guidelines Complete List Download

SQL SERVER - Database Coding Standards and Guidelines Complete List Download codingstandard
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I personally find this standard very useful and I practice everyday during my consultancy business. Let me know your thoughts.

Reference: Pinal Dave (https://blog.sqlauthority.com)

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76 Comments. Leave new

  • Frank W Holt
    May 23, 2008 5:57 pm

    Hello,

    Great document!

    I noticed you recommend having your table names be ‘plural’. It seems there are those who are passionate about making them singular. I was wondering what your reasoning is for doing it your way.

    Thanks
    Frank

    Reply
  • Its a fantastic job,your work will help many developers and God is almighty with you

    Reply
  • Hi Pinal,

    Really appreciate the work you have done.

    Have a question for you in regards to SQL Server Database Coding Standards and Guidelines

    Other than keeping within ANSI92 or being Oracle compatible why do you say “Do not use the identitycol or rowguidcol”?

    Thanks keep up the good work!!

    Zach

    Reply
  • Hi Pinal

    Really nice compilation. I am greately benifitted.

    I was going thru your article on Coding Standards. You have mentioned

    “Use BEGIN..END blocks only when multiple statements are present within a conditional code
    segment.”

    I think we should always use BEGIN…END blocks. Anyone else maintaining a code that I have written may put another line and lured by the indent think that he has put the statement inside the block. Later this may be a nightmare for the third person to debug.

    Reply
  • hello sir,

    can u tell why u r not use more than one oprimary key on a table

    Reply
  • HI

    I am preparing for interviews.
    If you can send me latest interview questions on SQL and PL?SQL that would be great.

    Site is very useful

    Reply
  • Hi,

    Great document!

    I noticed you recommend having table names as ‘plural’ but table is an entity and i think an entity should always be in ‘singular’. Correct me if i am wrong

    Thanks
    Ashok

    Reply
  • Hi!

    very nice and helpful link.

    Regards,
    R.Wright

    Reply
  • I agree with most of your guidelines. One that I don’t agree with, is using varchar instead of TEXT. TEXT results in a 16-byte only fixed column, while a varchar(max) could result in 8KB being accessed by the HDD and sent to the resultset. It just serves better to have a huge amount of data off-table and only accessed when needed. Even if a SELECT list is provided, excluding the varchar, the hard drive still has to read all of it into the page before producing the selective list, which is a waste.
    Ordinarily, I try to assess the maxlength of a varchar and its usability, and if it’s going to be used infrequently and could be very large, it goes into a TEXT column.

    One guideline I use that you didn’t mention, is to have keys at the front of the table, followed by fixed-length columns and variable length columns at the end of the table. Your assessment that varchars are faster to process than chars is only valid when the column length is large. Varchars require the application of a base address with an off-set to reach them. If one places fixed-length columns behind varchars, they, too, will be subject to an off-set. Setting relationships against columns behind varchars places a huge overhead burden on the server.

    Just some thoughts.

    Reply
    • Did you notice this point from BOL about TEXT datatype?

      This feature will be removed in a future version of Microsoft SQL Server. Avoid using this feature in new development work, and plan to modify applications that currently use this feature. Use varchar(max), nvarchar(max) and varbinary(max) data types instead. For more information, see Using Large-Value Data Types.

      Reply
  • I want list of pratical question of sql server 2000.
    Where i will get?

    Reply
  • PLEASE GIVE ME THE TIPS ABOU SQL CONTRAINT WORK

    Reply
  • Hi Pinal,

    Impressive stuff!

    I am currently looking for a tool which verifies whether SQL standards are met in the in the SQL script. For example if a input a stored procedure script then i would like see a report on what all predefined coding standards not met in the stored procedure.

    Do you know any tools available like that or let me know pointers to build that kind of a tool.

    Reply
  • HI

    I am preparing for interviews.
    If you can send me latest interview questions on SQL and PL?SQL that would be great.

    Site is very useful

    Reply
  • hi
    i am fresher.i don’t know sql server.please give more tips for sql server 2005 and sql server 2008

    Reply
  • this is very good artical.

    Reply
  • hi Pinal,
    extremely helpful info in a very simple manner with simple examples!!!
    that’s really great…

    Reply
  • Very Useful..Thanks for that…

    Reply
  • Ajaykumar Sinha
    June 9, 2009 4:16 pm

    thanks for such a nice supportive platform to enhance the skill and share their views for other awareness.

    Really, Pinalkumar Dave u are providing a helpline to the SQL professionals.

    Ajay Sinha

    Reply
  • Good stuff. wondering if you have any conventions namespaces for database objects.

    Reply
  • One of the best Sir,

    With lots of respect!

    Reply

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