SQL SERVER – The Basics of the SSIS Script Task – Notes from the Field #065

[Note from Pinal]: This is a new episode of Notes from the Field series. SQL Server Integration Service (SSIS) is one of the most key essential part of the entire Business Intelligence (BI) story. It is a platform for data integration and workflow applications.

SQL SERVER - The Basics of the SSIS Script Task - Notes from the Field #065 andyleonard

In this episode of the Notes from the Field series I asked SSIS Expert Andy Leonard a very crucial question – What are the basics of the SSIS script task and where do we start with it? Andy was very kind to answer the questions and provides plenty of information about how a novice developer can learn SSIS from the beginning and become expert in the technology.


Learning how to configure and use the SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) Script Task gives you a great starting point for learning how to use SSIS Control Flow tasks. You’ll find that SQL Server Control Flow tasks provide powerful development capabilities that may surprise you. Let there be no mistake, SSIS is a software development platform. With “SQL Server” included in the name, it is easy for people to confuse SSIS as a database tool or accessory, but Control Flow Tasks put that confusion to rest.

SSIS provides several Control Flow tasks. Here is a list that provides a good approximation of which tasks I use most, from most-used to least-used:

This article will focus on a basic example of configuring the SSIS Script Task, shown in Figure 1. People often think the SSIS Script Task is just for generating log messages, but let’s look at some of its more powerful capabilities.

SQL SERVER - The Basics of the SSIS Script Task - Notes from the Field #065 ntf-65-1

Figure 1: SSIS Script Task

The Script Task supports Microsoft Visual C# and Microsoft Visual Basic languages. You can choose which language you will use prior to clicking the Edit Script button. Once you’ve clicked the Edit Script button, you cannot change the Script Language property.

Solarwinds

At the heart of the Script Task is the ability to read a variable value from the SSIS package into the script and then write a message out of the Script Task. Because the Script Task can interact with SSIS variables, you can use .Net code to manipulate and respond to variable values.

For the purpose of our demonstration, we will add code to the Script Task to create a message for SSIS logging.

Messaging is a key component of enterprise architecture. Messages are generated (published, raised, produced, etc.) by Senders and received (subscribed, consumed, requested, etc.) by Listeners. Messaging is a complex topic. Entire books are dedicated to the topic.

Add variables to the ReadOnlyVariables and ReadWriteVariables properties by clicking the ellipsis inside the value textbox for each property. When you click the ellipsis, a Select Variables dialog appears, as you see in Figure 2.

SQL SERVER - The Basics of the SSIS Script Task - Notes from the Field #065 ntf-65-2

Figure 2: Adding Read Only Variables to the Script Task

SSIS variables use a two-part naming convention: <Namespace>::<VariableName>. I added the SSIS variables System::TaskName and System::PackageName. The selected variables are in the System namespace and contain the name of the task and package, respectively.

Click the Edit Script button to open the script editing window as shown in Figure 3:

SQL SERVER - The Basics of the SSIS Script Task - Notes from the Field #065 ntf-65-3

Figure 3: The Script Task Script Editor

Add the following code beneath the instruction to Add your code here:

Dim sPackageName As String = _ Dts.Variables("System::PackageName").Value.ToString
Dim sMsg As String = "I am " & sPackageName
Dts.Events.Fireinformation(1001, sPackageName, sMsg, "", 0, True)

Listing 1: VB.Net Code

The first line of the code in Listing 1 creates a VB.Net variable named sPackageName and initializes the value of this variable, setting it to the value of the SSIS Variable named System::PackageName. This is one way to read SSIS Variable values into a Script Task’s script.

The second line of the code in Listing 1 creates a VB.Net variable named sMsg and initializes the value of this variable with the text, “I am” plus the value contained in the sPackageName VB.Net variable.

The third line of the code shown in Listing 1 calls the FireInformation method in the Dts.Events assembly. FireInformation accepts six arguments:

  1. InformationCode – an integer you can use to identify custom messages sent from the SSIS package.
  2. SubComponent – a string you can use to populate the source of the message.
  3. Description – a string containing the message you wish to send.
  4. HelpFile – a string containing the location of a Help file (should a help file exist).
  5. HelpContext – an integer pointing to the help context (should a help context exist).
  6. FireAgain – a Boolean value indicating whether the event should subsequently fire.

My VB code includes a reference to the FireAgain argument. Note: This MSDN post states: “Because firing of an event may be expensive, the run-time engine provides a mechanism for suppressing events that you are not interested in. Every event firing method has a FireAgain parameter. If the value of this variable is false, after the method returns, the caller will not fire this event again for the duration of the current execution.” I understand this to mean setting FireAgain to False would suppress future FireInformation events in my Script Task, but testing indicates this is not correct. This is important for you to know because you may opt to use the FireAgain argument to manage when you raise events. I do not use the FireAgain argument for this purpose. I typically manage the decision to raise events in conditional logic surrounding the Event-raising code.

A test execution of the package reveals an Information message recorded on the Progress / Execution Results tab as shown in Figure 4.

SQL SERVER - The Basics of the SSIS Script Task - Notes from the Field #065 ntf-65-4

Figure 4: the Information Message on the Progress / Execution Results Tab

Information messages generated from Script Tasks will appear in SSIS logs and the SSIS Catalog. With this information, you can monitor the progress of SSIS execution while the package is running, or view the historical status of variable values or package messages after the package execution has completed.

The SSIS Script Task can accomplish much more than generating log messages. This brief introduction and basic example have demonstrated how to get started configuring and using the SSIS Script Task. As you can see, SSIS Script Tasks give you development capabilities you may not have been aware of.

If you want to get started with SSIS with the help of experts, read more over at Fix Your SQL Server.

Reference: Pinal Dave (https://blog.sqlauthority.com)

Solarwinds
, ,
Previous Post
Developer – 3 Tips Every SQL Expert Needs to Know to Land the Perfect Job (Part 2 of 3)
Next Post
Developer – 3 Tips Every SQL Expert Needs to Know to Land the Perfect Job (Part 3 of 3)

Related Posts

1 Comment. Leave new

  • H, thank you for your article. I am getting an error message with these two lines
    Dim sMsg As String = “I am ” & sPackageName
    Dts.Events.FireInformation(1001, sPackageName, sMsg, “”, 0, True)
    the error is ‘name sPackageName is not declared’

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Menu