SQL SERVER – A Practical Use of Backup Encryption

Backup is extremely important for any DBA. Think of any disaster and backup will come to rescue users in adverse situation. Similarly, it is very critical that we keep our backup safe as well. If your backup fall in the hands of bad people, it is quite possible that it will be misused and become serious data integrity issue. Well, in this blog post we will see a practical scenario where we will see how we can use Backup Encryption to improve security of the backup.

Database Backup Encryption is a brand new and long expected feature that is available now in SQL Server 2014. You can create an encrypted backup file by specifying the encryption algorithm and the encryptor (either a Certificate or Asymmetric Key).

The ability to protect a backup file with the password has been existing for many years. If you use SQL Server for a long time, you might remember the WITH PASSWORD option for the BACKUP command. The option prevented unauthorized access to the backup file.

However, this approach did not provide reliable protection. In that regard, Greg Robidoux noted on MSSQLTIPS: “Although this does add a level of security if someone really wants to crack the passwords they will find a way, so look for additional ways to secure your data.

To protect a backup file, SQL Server 2008 introduced the transparent data encryption (TDE) feature. Thus, a database had to be transparently encrypted before backup. Therefore, start with SQL Server 2012 the PASSWORD and MEDIAPASSWORD parameters are not used while creating backups. Even so, data encryption and backup files encryption are two different scenarios.

In case a database is stored locally, there is no need to encrypt it before backup. Fortunately in SQL Server 2014 there are two independent processes. Along with data encryption it is possible to encrypt a backup file based on a certificate or an asynchronous key. Supported encryption algorithms are:

  • AES 128
  • AES 192
  • AES 256
  • Triple DES

Practical use

To illustrate above mentioned, I will create an encrypted backup of the Adventureworks database. Also, you can back up directly to Azure. If needed, you may restore the encrypted back up file on Azure.

I will use dbForge Studio for SQL Server to create the encrypted backup file.

To protect the backup file we need to create an encryptor: either a Certificate or Asymmetric Key. Then, we need to pass this encryptor to the target SQL Server to restore the backup. For this, the encryptor must be exported from the source SQL Server and imported to the target SQL Server. There are no problems with the certificate in this regard. It is more complicated with asymmetric keys.

Taking into account that the BACKUP ASYMMETRIC KEY command is not available, and we can not just create a duplicate for an asymmetric key (compared to symmetric key), the only approach is to create the asymmetric key outside the SQL Server. Then we can use the sn.exe utility to transfer it inside SQL Server (CREATE ASYMMETRIC KEY ‘keyname’ FROM FILE = ‘filename.snk’). After that we can use this asymmetric key to encrypt the backup file on the source instance. Further we need to use the same *.snk file to create the asymmetric key on the target instance (and restore the backup file).

In our example we will not use asymmetric keys. We will use a certificate. Moreover the certificate (behind the scene) is the pair of open/closed keys.

Let’s create the server certificate and use it to encrypt the backup file.

SQL SERVER - A Practical Use of Backup Encryption devbackup1

The certificate will be protected with the database master key, because we didn’t specify the ENCRYPTION BY statement.

This is exactly what we need. Only certificates signed with the database master-key can be used for the encryption purposes. Otherwise, If we for instance, protect the certificate with the password ENCRYPTION BY PASSWORD = ‘strongpassword’, the following error appears while attempting to encrypt the backup file:

“Cannot use certificate ‘CertName’, because its private key is not present or it is not protected by the database master key.”

Encrypted backups (along with usual backups) can be traditionally created locally on the hard drive and in Azure Storage.

Instead of writing tons of SQL code I will use the convenient dbForge Studio for SQL Server Back Up wizard. The wizard allows to create the database backup in several clicks.

Step 1: Setup the DB Connection and the backup file location.

SQL SERVER - A Practical Use of Backup Encryption devbackup2

Step2: Setup mediaset

SQL SERVER - A Practical Use of Backup Encryption devbackup3

Step 3: Select the encryption algorithm and certificate.

SQL SERVER - A Practical Use of Backup Encryption devbackup4

In case you don’t want to pay extra attention to transferring the backup file to the Windows Azure, you can backup directly to Azure.

SQL SERVER - A Practical Use of Backup Encryption devbackup5

After the script execution in the required container the blob (with the backup) appears.

SQL SERVER - A Practical Use of Backup Encryption devbackup6

In case you had already created a backup with the same name in the same container, you can get the following error: There is currently a lease on the blob and no lease ID was specified in the request.

Further, you can restore the back up file on the Windows Azure.

Summary:

Obviously, it is a good practice to encrypt a backup file while transferring. This, for instance, allows to avoid data leak while transferring backups from one DPC to another.

Reference: Pinal Dave (https://blog.sqlauthority.com)

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2 Comments. Leave new

  • Hi Pinal. This is an excellent post!

    Reply
  • Hi Pinal,

    Could you explain how to restore database backup (encrypted using asymmetric key, stored in Azure Key Vault) to another server.

    Reply

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