SQL SERVER – Beginning with SQL Server Security Aspects

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SQL Server Security Aspects

This article is the high-level overview of the SQL Server security best practices and aspects. Ensuring SQL Server security is an important task that may be successfully solved by applying best practices and proven solutions described further in this article.

Physical Security

SQL Server physical security aspects are often overlooked. Frequently DB admins focus on the software security and network security, while completely forgetting about the physical server itself. However, the possibility to physically reach the server, will lead to abrogation of all other security configurations that they apply to the software. As far as SQL Server is installed on a physical device, whether it would be server hardware, desktop PC, laptop, or other PC in a data center. The physical security main goal is to prevent someone from gaining access to the machine.

Shared data centers or server rooms provide a wide range of physical and environmental security to ensure that secure areas are protected by appropriate entry controls to ensure that only authorized personnel are allowed access. An appropriate, physical protection should be provided against damage from natural, or man-made disasters, such as fire, flood, explosion etc. All users are required to ensure that systems are not left open to access by intruders to buildings, or by unauthorized colleagues.

If the personnel in the data center is unable to physically lock away the server, you must ensure that all USB ports on the server are disabled. Keep in mind that security is not complete if physical security is overlooked.

Network Security

The network is the way that external threads may come to attack your SQL Server.

Firewalls provide efficient means to implement security. A firewall is a separator or restrictor of network traffic, which can be configured to enforce your data security policy. If you use a firewall, you will increase security at the operating system.

SQL Server Instance Security

Every SQL Server instance that is installed on a PC can be considered to be a security domain. Thus, at the instance level you could apply separate security considerations.

I will use the dbForge Studio for SQL Server v 4.0 for the demonstration purposes as it has an excellent tool called Security Manager.

The following picture demonstrates two separate instances of SQL Server on the same computer. Each has its own specific name, the first one is MSSQLSERVER\Instance1, the second one is MSSQLSERVER\Instance2.

SQL SERVER - Beginning with SQL Server Security Aspects instanses_horizontal

This picture gives us the ability to see how security applies at the instance level. SQL Server Security uses the concept of securables that will be discussed later in this article.

Securables are the objects to which the SQL Server authorization system controls access. For instance, a table is a securable. Some securables can be contained within others, creating nested hierarchies called “scopes”. The securable scopes are server, database, and schema.

An object that receives permission to a securable is called a principal. The most common principals are logins and users.

A login is a security principal, or an entity that can be authenticated by a secure system. Users need a login to connect to SQL Server. You can create a login based on a Windows principal (such as a domain user or a Windows domain group) or you can create a login that is not based on a Windows principal (such as an SQL Server login).

To control access to securables, a DB admin can grant or deny permissions, or add logins and users to roles that have access.

It is important to note that every individual instance has it’s own set of security considerations. The security folders on each instance contain the same users, application roles,(etc.) folders. However, if we expand the logins folder you can see the different number of accounts.

SQL SERVER - Beginning with SQL Server Security Aspects logins

This proves that we can have different security settings for individual users across different instances.

It is also important to note that when you do set up an SQL Server instance, you only install the necessary features that are necessary for that instance to operate. This reduces the possibility to attack of your specific SQL Server instance, by reducing the number of services and features that are available for malicious users to gain access to.

SQL Server Securables

Securables are the resources to which the SQL Server Database Engine authorization system regulates access. Essentially these are the database objects to which you can apply security on your instance of SQL Server. Some securables are standalone and others may be contained within another securable.

Each database also has its own security folder, where we can focus on users, which again, become the logins that we assign the permissions to for our database.

SQL SERVER - Beginning with SQL Server Security Aspects db-level-security

We also have database level roles and application roles. Currently, there are no application roles assigned on this server. There are another components that we do not see in the Database Explorer, however they still exist at the data base level. These components are assemblies which are typically DLL files that are used in the instance of sequel server for deploying functions stored procedures, or triggers. These components are managed by CLR.

SQL Server Principals

There are three high level categories of SQL Server security principals:

  1. Windows level (domain and local logins)
  2. SQL Server level (SQL Logins and server roles)
  3. Database level (database users, DB and application roles)

There are two SQL Server authentication types:

  • by using Windows account security token
  • by using an account defined inside SQL Server

You can tune the type of authentication during installation. Windows mode is the most secure, as it relies on Windows accounts as opposed to SQL accounts. The recommended setting is Windows Authentication and it is selected by default. This authentication type simplifies administration and is more secure, because it uses Windows security tokens. There is no need to remember another password, and no password transits through the local network.

You cannot disable Windows authentication, however you can extend it with SQL Server authentication. Thus, in case you need to allow access to the users outside the local network, you should use SQL Server authentication. In this case, logins are defined and managed inside SQL Server. The authentication and password validation is managed by SQL Server also.

There are also default roles created during installation as well. One of which is known as the public role.

SQL SERVER - Beginning with SQL Server Security Aspects public-role

SQL Server creates the public role as a way of assigning permissions to users who have accounts on the database, but who do not have any other currently assigned permissions. The public role serves the purpose, of providing limited permissions to user accounts on the database, until you’ve had the opportunity to assign the necessary permissions for those user accounts. SQL Server also includes a guest user account. This account is not a server level account, but exists at the database level.

If we expand the users folder within the database, we will notice a guest account, that is available for each database. The guest account is used to grant permissions to users, who might be able to access the database. But, who do not have a user account assigned, or created in the database itself.

SQL SERVER - Beginning with SQL Server Security Aspects guest-user

The guest account cannot be dropped, but it can be disabled, through the revocation of the connect permission. User and application access to your SQL Server instance, will be controlled using these security principles.

Manage Logins and Users

As mentioned above in this article, SQL Server implements security through the use of securables, which are the database objects, and security principles, which are the user’s inner applications that will access the database.

If you know how to create the logins and user accounts – it is the first step in creating the authentication and authorization model for your SQL Server.

Before creating logins, you must know which authentication mode SQL Server instance is configured to use. In case of mixed mode authentication, we can create Windows accounts, or we can create local SQL Server accounts for authentication on the instance of SQL Server.

Keep in mind that SQL Server allows you to create logins through Windows accounts or SQL Server accounts at the server level. Also SQL Server permits the creation of local user accounts at the database level. If we expand the database, and expand the Security folder, we notice that SQL Server includes a Users folder at the database level.

Simply right click the Users folder, and then click New User. This allows us to choose a user type at the database level, as opposed to the server level. We can create SQL user with or without a login, what means that this would be a user name we create specifically in this database.

SQL SERVER - Beginning with SQL Server Security Aspects CreateLogin

A good example of such an account is the guest account, which is created at the database level, but does not exist at the logins level for the server itself.

You can set the authentication mode to Mix Mode at any time after the installation. And then you can create SQL Server accounts, or use Windows accounts, depending on your choice.

Understanding each type of account and how security is applied to these accounts will help you set the proper security for user access.

Understanding and using roles

SQL Server roles allow you to group users or logins into a specific container for assigning permissions to securables on your SQL Server instance. Permissions assigned to a role are applied to any user or login that is associated with that role. SQL Server provides nine fixed server roles. You can find these server roles in the Security folder of the SQL Server instance. Outside of the nine fixed server roles, SQL Server also provides database level roles.

SQL SERVER - Beginning with SQL Server Security Aspects db-level-roles

SQL Server Permissions

Accessing any of the secureables in SQL Server requires that the login or user have permissions. The permissions in SQL Server follow certain naming conventions. The security check algorithm used by SQL is complex. And the complexity comes from the need to evaluate group or role membership, as well as explicit and implicit permissions.

There are three core elements of SQL Server permission checking:

  1. Security context. This is related to the user, the login or the role.
  2. Permission space. The permission space will focus around the securable, such as the database object that the user is attempting to access. SQL Server checks the permissions that the principle has been assigned according to that securable.
  3. Required permissions. This is an important step because some tasks require more than one permission. For instance, if a user attempts to execute a stored procedure, the execute permission would be required in the stored procedure itself.

Summary

SQL Server security is too huge topic to be discussed in a single article. However, this article provides an overview of core principles and concepts of SQL Server security.

Reference: Pinal Dave (https://blog.sqlauthority.com)

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1 Comment. Leave new

  • vadnereharshalgmailcom
    September 24, 2015 11:13 am

    Hi,
    I have one doubt on window authentication, if logged in user is not a member of sql server account then how he can logged in sql and server and how can have full access of DB?
    under which security group he will get access?

    Pls clear my doubt.

    Reply

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