SQL SERVER – Tips from the SQL Joes 2 Pros Development Series – Introduction to Views – Day 23 of 35

Answer simple quiz at the end of the blog post and -

Every day one winner from India will get Joes 2 Pros Volume 4.

Every day one winner from United States will get Joes 2 Pros Volume 4.

View Options

Not every query may be turned into a view.  There are rules which must be followed before your queries may be turned into views.

View Rules

This query includes a simple aggregation which totals the grant amounts according to each EmpID.  It’s a handy report, but we can’t turn it into a view. The error message shown displays when you attempt to run this code and create the view.  Notice that it says “…no column name was specified for column 2.”

We must first make certain this expression field column has a name before we can create this view. Alias the expression field as “TotalAmount” and then run this CREATE VIEW statement for vEmpGrantTotals.

CREATE VIEW dbo.vEmpGrantTotals
AS
SELECT
EmpID, SUM(Amount) AS TotalAmount
FROM [Grant]
GROUP BY EmpID

Encrypting Views

Suppose you want to make sure that people can utilize this view to run reports, but you don’t want them to be capable of seeing or recreating the underlying code.  The sp_HelpText system stored procedure reveals the code which created an object.

We want to alter this view so that the source code is encrypted.  Two modifications to the code for vEmpGrantTotals will make this change:

1)        Change CREATE VIEW to ALTER VIEW.

2)        Add WITH ENCRYPTION before the AS keyword.

ALTER VIEW dbo.vEmpGrantTotals
WITH ENCRYPTION
AS
SELECT
EmpID, SUM(Amount) AS TotalAmount
FROM [Grant]
GROUP BY EmpID

The best practice after we create or alter an object is to run a SELECT statement to confirm that it produces the expected result.  Look at Object Explorer and notice that a small padlock now appears on the icon for vEmpGrantTotals.

Often times you can just right-click a view in Object Explorer and choose “Script View as” to see the code for the view.  Now when we attempt that maneuver for our encrypted view, SSMS gives us a message saying that the text is encrypted and we can’t script this view. Management Studio (SSMS) will not allow us to generate code for the encrypted view. The properties dialog for vEmpGrantTotals also tells us that the view is now encrypted.

Attempt to run the sp_HelpText sproc and notice the message, “The text for object ‘dbo.vEmpGrantTotals’ is encrypted.”.

sp_helptext 'dbo.vEmpGrantTotals'

Msg 15009, Level 16, State 1, Procedure sp_helptext, Line 54

The object ‘dbo.vEmpGrantTotals’ does not exist in database ‘JProCo’ or is invalid for this operation.

Note: If you want to setup the sample JProCo database on your system you can watch this video. For this post you will want to run the SQLProgrammingChapter4.2Setup.sql script from Volume 4.

Question 23

What are the two ways to see the code that created a view? (Choose Two)

  1. WITH SCHEMABINDING
  2. WITH ENCRYPTION
  3. sp_helptext
  4. sp_depends
  5. sys.syscomments

Rules:

Please leave your answer in comment section below with correct option, explanation and your country of resident.
Every day one winner will be announced from United States.
Every day one winner will be announced from India.
A valid answer must contain country of residence of answerer.
Please check my facebook page for winners name and correct answer.
Every day one winner from India will get Joes 2 Pros Volume 4.
Every day one winner from United States will get Joes 2 Pros Volume 4.
The contest is open till next blog post shows up at http://blog.sqlauthority.com which is next day GTM+2.5.

Reference:  Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com)

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106 thoughts on “SQL SERVER – Tips from the SQL Joes 2 Pros Development Series – Introduction to Views – Day 23 of 35

  1. Hi,

    The options given do not seem to fit, so I’ll go ahead and give you answers from your post. The two ways to view the code that created a view are:

    1. Run a SCRIPT VIEW AS –> CREATE TO command
    2. Run the system stored procedure sp_helptext on the view with the syntax sp_helptext ” . Based on the scenario, we can choose to include or exclude the schema prefix.

    Ramakrishnan RS
    Mysore, India

  2. Q.No 23 : What are two ways to see the code that created a view? (Choose two)

    1) Using sp_helptext

    2) In Object explorer, Right click a view and choose “Script View as” to see the code for the view.

    Note: i think today Quiz answers are not related to question. Its same like as yesterday Quiz. please, review it.

    Chennai, Tamilnadu, India

  3. Hi All,

    I have fixed question of this quiz. Due to a small mix up different question was posted here but now everything is fixed. Please look at that and see if you can win book 4:)

  4. Hi Pinal,

    This should be « SQL SERVER – Tips from the SQL Joes 2 Pros Development Series – All about SQL Constraints – Day 23 of 35 whereas its marked as 22.

    Topic is View whereas Question is on constraint. Please take a look & fix this.

    Thanks

    Sudhir

  5. Hi,

    Option 3 & 5 are correct as sp_helpText returns the text unless its encrypted. and sys.syscomments.

    for example
    select text from sys.syscomments a
    inner join sys.objects b on a.id = b.object_id
    where b.name = ‘viewname’ –view is the name of the view

    sp_helptext ‘viewname’

    Thanks

    Sudhir Chawla
    New Delhi, INDIA

  6. If the view is not encrypted, you can see its definition using sp_helptext SP or sys.syscomments.

    So, the correct options are 3 and 5.

    I am from USA

  7. Correct answers are:
    * Use sp_helptext ‘dbo.viewName’
    * right-click a view in Object Explorer and choose “Script View as”
    Rene Castro
    El Salvador

  8. I think the title of the Day is wrong. The post is about views, not about constraints. The content of the page and questions seem to be OK, but the title doesn’t look correct to me.

    Also, this text didn’t mention sys.syscomments, so I just ran a query

    select * from sys.syscomments to make sure it included the view definition.

  9. Only option 3 is correct. Other option is to use the Ui to generate the script using ssms. Right click the view and click Create script to new query editor window

    Sathya
    India

  10. Q.No 23 : What are two ways to see the code that created a view? (Choose two)

    1) Using sp_helptext ‘vEmpGrantTotals’
    should not use scheema.viewname.

    2) In Object explorer –> database –> Views–> Right click on view and choose “Script View as” to see the code for the view.

    Raghunath.G.R
    Bangalore, India

  11. Hi,

    sp_helptext displays the view definition.
    In addition,
    sys.syscomments itself is a view.
    sp_helptext ‘sys.syscomments’

    India

  12. If not use Encryption in view

    we can see code using sp_helptext

    WITH SCHEMABINDING is used to binds a view to the schema of the tables.

    WITH ENCRYPTION used to encrypt a view or sps.

    sp_depends := Displays information about database object dependencies, such as the views and procedures that depend on a table or view.

    sys.syscomments := Contains entries for each view, rule, default, trigger, CHECK constraint, DEFAULT constraint, and stored procedure within the database.

    So Only one option is correct ie., option 3. sp_helptext

    Nikhildas
    Cochin
    INDIA

  13. Pingback: SQL SERVER – Win a Book a Day – Contest Rules – Day 0 of 35 Journey to SQLAuthority

  14. The Correct Options are
    ==================
    3.sp_helptext
    5.sys.syscomments

    Explanation:

    sp_helptext :

    We can use this to display the the definition of a View.
    sp_helptext

    sys.syscomments :

    Contains entries for each view, rule, default, trigger, CHECK constraint, DEFAULT constraint, and stored procedure within the database. The text column contains the original SQL definition statements.

    SELECT sys.sysobjects.name, sys.syscomments.text
    FROM sys.sysobjects INNER JOIN syscomments
    ON sys.sysobjects.id = sys.syscomments.id
    WHERE sys.sysobjects.NAME = ”
    AND sys.sysobjects.type = ‘V’

    sys.sysobjects.name – displays the View Name
    sys.syscomments.text – displays the definition of the View
    [To get the id of the view object - we join sys.syscomments with the sys.sysobjects]

    Country :
    =======
    India

  15. Correct Answer is 3 & 5.

    3. sp_helptext
    5. sys.syscomments

    sp_helptext: We can use this to display the the definition of a View.

    sys.syscomments: Contains entries for each view, rule, default, trigger, CHECK constraint, DEFAULT constraint, and stored procedure within the database. The text column contains the original SQL definition statements.

    sys.sysobjects.name – Displays the View Name.
    sys.syscomments.text – Displays the definition of the View.

    Gopalakrishnan Arthanarisamy
    Unisys, Bangalore, India

  16. Correct answer to this question is options

    3 sp_helptext and
    5 sys.syscomments

    With sp_helptext passing object name like view,procedure,function etc we can see its defination. With using sys.syscomments you can make a query on text column.

    Mahmad Khoja
    INDIA
    AHMEDABAD

  17. Assumption:
    That the view is not created with encryption key word:

    The two answers are:
    3.sp_helptext
    and
    5.sys.syscomments
    sys.syscomments Contains entries for each view, rule, default, trigger, CHECK constraint, DEFAULT constraint, and stored procedure within the database. The text column contains the original SQL definition statements.

    Sonnie Avens
    New York, USA

  18. Correct options are 3 & 5.

    3.sp_helptext
    sp_helptext ‘viewname’

    5. sys.syscomments
    SELECT A.text,object_name(A.id)
    FROM sys.syscomments A
    WHERE A.id = object_ID(‘viewname’)

    New Delhi
    India

  19. Ans: 3 And 5 both are correct

    3.sp_helptext ‘viewName’

    5.select [text] from sys.syscomments sc
    inner join sys.objects so on sc.id = so.object_id
    where so.[name] = ‘viewname’

    Partha
    India

  20. The Correct Answer for this Question is Option – 3 & 5

    Through Sp_Helptext, Sys.syscomments we can see the code that created a view.

    Thanks,
    Narendra (India).

  21. Answer
    Option 3: sp_helptext
    Query: sp_helptext vw_USER_PRIVILEGES
    Result:
    CREATE VIEW [dbo].[vw_USER_PRIVILEGES]
    AS
    SELECT DISTINCT U.USER_ID, UPV.PRIVILEGE
    FROM dbo.USERS AS U INNER JOIN
    dbo.USER_ROLES AS UR ON U.USER_ID = UR.USER_ID INNER JOIN
    dbo.USER_PROFILE_DEFINITIONS AS UPD ON UR.PROFILE_ID = UPD.PROFILE_ID INNER JOIN
    dbo.USER_PRIVILEGES AS UPV ON UPD.PRIVILEGE_ID = UPV.PRIVILEGE_ID

    Option 5: sys.syscomments
    It will get all the system object (strored procedure, user defined function and Views).
    Query: SELECT * FROM sys.syscomments
    Result:
    id, number, colid, status ctext, texttype, language, encrypted, compressed, text
    155863622 0 1 0 0x280030002900 2 0 0 0 (0)
    160055656 0 1 0 0x0D000A004300520045004100540045002000460055004E004300540049004F004E002000640062006F002E00660075006E0063005F005200450050004D0041004E005F004700450054005F0055005300450052005F005200450050004F00520054005F0048004900530054004F005200590020000D000A00280009000D000A00090009004 2 0 0 0 CREATE FUNCTION dbo.func_REPORT_HISTORY ( @USER_ID INT , @NR_OF_ENTRIES INT , @FILTER_DUPLICATES BIT ) RETURNS @GET_USER_REPORT TABLE ( USER_REPORT_HISTORY_ID INT , USER_REPORT_ID INT , USER_REPORT_NAME VARCHAR(128) ) AS BEGIN IF (@FILTER_DUPLICATES = 1) BEGIN SELECT * FROM EMPLOYEES END RETURN END

    874486194 0 1 0 0x4300520045004100540045002000560049004500570020005B00640062006F005D002E005B00760077005F0049004E0056004F004900430045005F0041004E0041004C0059005300490053005F00500052004F0044005500430054005F00470052004F00550050005D000D000A00410053000D000A000D000A000900530045004C0045004 2 0 0 0 CREATE VIEW [dbo].[vw_INVOICE_PRODUCT_GROUP] AS SELECT TOP (100) PERCENT ORGANIZATION_NAME AS ORGANIZATION FROM ORGANIZATION ORDER BY ORGANIZATION_NAME

  22. Option # 3 which is SP_HelpText would show you if it is not encrypted so option #3 would be right answer.

    At the same time, if you want to see TSQL script for the view or SPs etc. you can use Sys.SysComments too.

    here is the script for the same from my blogpost.

    http://www.sqlhub.com/2009/05/find-specific-word-or-phrase-from-all.html

    SELECT DISTINCT so.name,sc.text
    FROM syscomments sc
    INNER JOIN sysobjects so ON sc.id=so.id
    WHERE so.xtype in (‘V’) and sc.TEXT LIKE ‘%YourViewName%’
    order by name

    this will not guarantee of one results, if you have call your view in another View, it will return that too but SP_HelpText would guarantee you the perfect matching one result only.

  23. my answer for the questions is

    3. sp_helptext
    5.sys.syscomments

    the explanation for both option is as follows.

    3. sp_helptext —-
    CREATE VIEW authorlist
    (AuthorName, Location)
    AS
    SELECT SUBSTRING(au_fname + ‘ ‘ + au_lname,1,25),
    SUBSTRING(city + ‘, ‘ + state + ‘ ‘ + zip,1,25)
    FROM authors
    GO

    SELECT * FROM authorlist


    — see your views:
    SELECT name, crdate
    FROM sysobjects
    WHERE type = ‘V’

    — to see your source code for the view
    EXECUTE sp_helptext AuthorList
    execute this code, u will get the information

    5.sys.syscomments
    The actual code for views, rules, defaults, triggers, CHECK constraints, DEFAULT constraints and stored procedures are stored in the syscomments table. The column TEXT in the syscomments table contains the actual code for all these objects.

    select TEXT from syscomments
    Where TEXT like ‘%author%’

    execute this and will get information

    Thanks & Regards,
    Ragini Gupta,
    India

  24. Hi Sir,

    The correct options are 3 and 5

    For the example shown in the above article.

    3. if we run the sp_helptext ‘dbo.vEmpGrantTotals’ we get the code that created a view.

    5. sys.syscomments should be used with a join with sys.sysobjects to get the code that created a view.

    the query is :

    SELECT [text] FROM sys.syscomments AS a
    JOIN sys.sysobjects AS b ON b.id = a.id
    WHERE b.name = ‘vEmpGrantTotals’

    Thanks and Regards,
    P.Anish Shenoy,
    INDIA,Bangalore, Karnataka.

  25. Valid options are 3 and 5:-

    3.sp_helptext
    sp_helptext ‘viewname’

    5. sys.syscomments
    SELECT A.text,object_name(A.id)
    FROM sys.syscomments A
    WHERE A.id = object_ID(‘viewname’)

    Bangalore
    India

  26. Hi Pinal,

    The correct options are 3 and 5

    3. sp_helptext Displays the definition of a user-defined view or system object such as a system stored procedure.This gives the code thar created the view.

    5. sys.syscomments Contains entries for each view,stored procedure within the database. This should be used with a join with sys.sysobjects to get the code that created a view.

    Thanks & Regards
    Santosh.S
    Bangalore, India

  27. At Present, according to me, code that created a view, can be seen using “sp_helptext” and “sys.syscomments”

    sp_helptext displays the definition of a user-defined rule, unencrypted Transact-SQL stored procedure/ view, user-defined Transact-SQL function, trigger, computed column, CHECK constraint,or system stored procedure.
    Where as,
    sys.syscomments contains entries for each view, rule, default, trigger, CHECK constraint, DEFAULT constraint, and stored procedure within the database. The text column contains the original SQL definition statements. In SQL server 2008, its mapped as “sys.sql_modules”

    Syntax for sp_helptext is as follows,
    USE [database_name];
    GO
    EXEC sp_helptext ‘[view_name]‘;
    GO

    Syntax for sys.sql_modules is as follows,
    USE [database_name];
    GO
    SELECT sm.object_id
    FROM sys.sql_modules AS sm
    GO

    Other than the options given above, one can also see the code by right clicking the object explorer and selecting ‘script view’.

    COUNTRY – INDIA

  28. Correct Options are

    3.sp_helptext
    5.sys.syscomments

    CREATE VIEW dbo.vEmpGrantTotals
    AS
    SELECT EmpID, SUM(Amount) AS TotalAmount
    FROM [Grant]
    GROUP BY EmpID

    For sp_helptext
    =============
    sp_helptext vEmpGrantTotals

    For sys.syscomments
    =================
    SELECT DISTINCT c.text
    FROM syscomments c
    inner JOIN sysobjects o ON
    c.[id] = o.[id]
    WHERE o.[name] = ‘vEmpGrantTotals’ AND o.TYPE =’V’

    Thanks,
    Mitesh Modi
    Gujarat, India

  29. The correct Answers are :3.sp_helptext, 5. sys.syscomments

    3.sp_helptext ‘[view_name]‘

    there is no easy way to use the result of this query.

    5. sys.syscomments

    The disadvantage here is that this method is lengthy and you have to specify the object name and schema name separately.

    http://bit.ly/oeZBJv

    Richardson, Texas, USA

  30. Correct Answer is option 3 & 5.

    3. sp_helptext
    5. sys.syscomments

    sp_helptext: We can use this to display the the definition of a View.

    sys.syscomments: Contains entries for each view, rule, default, trigger, CHECK constraint, DEFAULT constraint, and stored procedure within the database. The text column contains the original SQL definition statements.

    sys.sysobjects.name – Displays the View Name.
    sys.syscomments.text – Displays the definition of the View.

    Malay Shah
    Ahmedabad, India

  31. Something must have gone wacky with this email: It has the same title as yesterdays email (Day 22 of 35 not Day 23 of 35), this question is about View Options, at the bottom of the email it shows Question 23 along with a question about views (What are two ways to see the code that created a view? (Choose two)), but the options to choose from came from the Check Constraint question from day 22 of 35.

    Since I have no real options to choose from I will also choose options 3 & 5

    USA

    Mike Michalicek

  32. Answers 3 and 5 will work.

    You can also use sys.sql_modules with code to the effect of:
    SELECT definition
    FROM sys.sql_modules
    WHERE object_id = Object_id(”)

    Matt Nelson, USA

  33. The Correct answers are option 3 & 5.
    Examples,
    We we take view1 as a view definition.

    then,

    sp_helptext View1

    SELECT text FROM sys.syscomments WHERE id = OBJECT_ID(‘View1′);

    Regards,
    Girish Rokade
    Pune India

  34. Answers are 3 and 5.

    Additionally you can also use “Script View as” which is what I’ve typically done. However, none of these methods will work once encryption is turned on. It is a way to protect others from viewing the code.

    USA

  35. Hi Pinal,

    Challenge:
    What are the two ways to see the code that created a view? (Choose Two)

    1.WITH SCHEMABINDING
    2.WITH ENCRYPTION
    3.sp_helptext
    4.sp_depends
    5.sys.syscomments

    Correct Answer with Explanation:
    The correct choices listed abobe to see the code that created a view are #3 and #5: using sp_helptext and by running a query against sys.syscomments. The view cannot be encrypted, though.

    Country:
    United States

    Thanks for the knowledge!

    Regards,

    Bill Pepping

  36. Answer to the above question is :

    3.sp_helptext
    5.sys.syscomments

    Why option 3 :
    Sp_helptext is a system stored procedure, which is used to view the contents of the objects created in SQL Server. Contents of objects such as unencrypted stored procedure, user defined function, view, trigger etc. etc. can be displayed using above mentioned SSP.

    To view the contents of view using sp_helptext

    sp_helptext

    Why option 5 :
    sys.syscomments contains information / entry regarding all objects those are getting created in SQL Server. Objects such as sp name, functions, views, check constaints, default constaints, rules, triggers etc. etc. The definition of all the above mentioned objects is stored in Name column of sys.syscomments.

    To view the contents of view using sys.syscomments

    select name,text from sys.syscomments a
    inner join sys.objects b on a.id = b.object_id
    where b.name = ‘view_name’ and b.xtype=’V’

    Kedar Dighe.
    Country of Residence – India

  37. The correct options are 3 and 5.

    3)
    sp_helptext ‘viewname’

    and

    5)
    select sc.text from sys.syscomments sc
    inner join sys.objects so on sc.id = so.object_id
    where so.name = ‘view_name’

    Country: USA

  38. Correct Answer are: 3 & 5.

    3. sp_helptext
    5. sys.syscomments

    sp_helptext: Can be used to display the the definition of a View.

    sys.syscomments: It has definition of each view, rule, default, trigger, CHECK constraint, DEFAULT constraint, and stored procedure within the database.

    Country: India

  39. Hi Pinal,

    The correct answers are Option #3) and Option #5)

    For the example shown in the above article.

    Option 3)Here when we run the sp_helptext ‘View’ we will have the source code used for actually creating the specified View.

    Option 5)Here sys.syscomments is to be used along with a join with sys.sysobjects to get the same code.

    Other uses of sys.syscomments

    1. “Retrieves the name of stored procedures which consists the text ‘order’ in the definition.”

    2. “Retrieves the name of view, rule, default, trigger, CHECK constraint, DEFAULT constraint, and stored procedures which consists the text ‘order’ in the comments.”

    3. “Retrieves the name of view, rule, default, trigger, CHECK constraint, DEFAULT constraint, and stored procedures which consists of the text ‘order’ in the definition.”

    Comments are part of a procedure’s definition, so if you retrieve the definiton, you retrieve the comments as well.

    CREATE PROCEDURE QOTD_Test
    AS
    PRINT ‘This is a test'; — this is a comment
    GO

    SELECT “text” FROM sys.syscomments WHERE id = OBJECT_ID(‘QOTD_Test’);
    The result of the SELECT statement contains the “this is a comment” comment

    this is also an option.

    Diljeet kumari
    country : India

  40. following two of the ways to see the code that created a view.

    option 3: sp_helptext and
    option 5 :sys.syscomments

    Somnath Desai
    India

  41. The Correct Answer: Option 3 & 5

    Through Sp_Helptext, Sys.syscomments we can see the code that created a view.

    Country : USA

  42. Q.No 23 : What are two ways to see the code that created a view? (Choose two)

    3) sp_helptext

    5) sys.syscomments

    —-

    sp_helptext

    select text from sys.syscomments where id =
    (select object_id from sys.objects where name = )

    Chennai, Tamilnadu, India

  43. The correct answer is 3 and 5
    3) Sp_helptext
    5) sys.syscomments

    Example:

    — creating view

    CREATE VIEW MYVIEW
    AS
    SELECT * FROM SALES

    — Displaying the View code with sp_helptext

    SP_HELPTEXT MYVIEW

    — Displaying the View code with using sys.syscomments

    SELECT TEXT FROM SYS.SYSCOMMENTS WHERE ID=OBJECT_ID(‘MYVIEW’)

    country INDIA

  44. What if we encrypted it then i myself want to change the view code ? any way to decrypt it back or else i’ll always need a readable backup copy .

    Namaste (regards)!
    Anugrah

  45. 1) Using sp_helptext ‘vEmpGrantTotals’
    should not use scheema.viewname.

    2) In Object explorer –> database –> Views–> Right click on view and choose “Script View as” to see the code for the view

    Bablu
    INDIA

  46. Question no 23.
    Correct Answer 3 & 5 [sp_helptext & sys.syscomments]

    Description :–
    Sys.syscomments :– This is a system view which use other different system objects.

    sp_helptext :: is used to show the definition of store procedure and view. If you see the definition of sp_helptext, then you find that this system store procedure is using sys.syscomments system view.

    Vinay

  47. Correct Answers are : 3 & 5

    Because.,

    Sp_helptext:
    Displays the definition of a user-defined rule, default, unencrypted Transact-SQL stored procedure, user-defined Transact-SQL function, trigger, computed column, CHECK constraint, view, or system object such as a system stored procedure.

    sys.syscomments:
    Contains entries for each view, rule, default, trigger, CHECK constraint, DEFAULT constraint, and stored procedure within the database. The text column contains the original SQL definition statements.

    Raju,
    India.

  48. Pinal,

    Correct Answers are 3(sp_helptext) & 5(sys.syscomments)

    Desc:
    sys.syscomments:-
    select [text] from syscomments where id = OBJECT_ID(”)
    sp_helptext:-
    sp_helptext ”
    Otherways are:
    1. GOTO Object Explorer –> Database –> Views–> Right click on view and select “Script View as” to find the vode of the view
    2. select VIEW_DEFINITION from information_schema.VIEWS where TABLE_NAME =”

    Location: India

  49. Answers: Option 3 and 5
    If it is not encrypted you can get the code definition from sys.syscomments and/or sp_helptext.
    Additionally you can get it from the GUI by right clicking the view and selecting to script it out.

  50. Option 3 and 5 are correct:

    3. sp_helptext – this system stored procedure reveals the code which created an object.

    5. sys.syscomments – Contains entries for each view, rule, default, trigger, CHECK constraint, DEFAULT constraint, and stored procedure within the database. The text column contains the original SQL definition statements.

    Additionally using SSMS you can right-click on the view and click “script view as” and choose “create to” and then “new query editor window” to see the code used to create the view.

    Country of Residence: USA

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