SQL SERVER – SQL Basics Video: Database Datafiles and Logfiles – SQL in Sixty Seconds #063

This is the 8th post out of my 10 post series of my videos on my 10th book – SQL Basics. Today will show the importance of data and information.

You can get that in Paperback (USA) and Kindle (Worldwide).

We know that SQL Server stores its data much like other applications, in files which are saved to a persistent drive. But a distinguishing feature of SQL Server is its robust ability to keep track of things. The security and safety of the data and reliability of the system are SQL Server’s top priorities. Therefore, you can imagine that logging activity, which tracks every transaction made in the database, is a pretty big deal. Examples where logging saves the day generally involve some type of database restore or recovery need. Once a database backs itself up, we are generally assured a reliable mechanism we can use to restore the system in case something unfavorable happens. Suppose we notice bad data has come into the system through one of the periodic feeds. In fact, this data is so problematic that the team decided we must restore the database back to the point a week ago. This gets us back to a time before the bad data began entering the system. The periodic database backup is built using information provided by the logfile. Logfiles keep track of the database transactions and help ensure data and system integrity, in case a system recovery is ever necessary.

SQL in Sixty Seconds Video

We have attempted to explain the same subject in simple words over in following video.

Action Item

Get the book for yourself and your friend. This is just a reference everyone must have it.

Read the related blog post: SQL Basics: Database Datafiles and Logfiles – Day 8 of 10

Available in Paperback (USA), Kindle (Worldwide) 

Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com)

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SQL SERVER – SQL Basics Video: Database Careers – SQL in Sixty Seconds #062

This is the 7th post out of my 10 post series of my videos on my 10th book – SQL Basics. Today will show the importance of data and information.

You can get that in Paperback (USA) and Kindle (Worldwide).

The live system is the one that interacts with our customers and must stay up during all business hours which is often 24-7 in today’s global business world. These databases should be designed to collect the data in transactions that are needed to do business. This is often called the Online Transaction Processing database (or OLTP database). This OLTP system must respond immediately to user requests through a proper interface (such as an ATM).  During peak business hours the OLTP system can slow down and cause customer delays. If we were to run a query for a business meeting during this peak time we could slow the live system even further. For this reason any testing or analysis is often done on a copy of the database. This way company work and research can get done without interfering with the customer’s usage of the same database.

SQL in Sixty Seconds Video

We have attempted to explain the same subject in simple words over in following video.

Action Item

Get the book for yourself and your friend. This is just a reference everyone must have it.

Read the related blog post: SQL Basics: Database Careers – Day 7 of 10

Available in Paperback (USA), Kindle (Worldwide) 

Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com)

SQL SERVER – SQL Basics Video: SQL Code Generators – SQL in Sixty Seconds #061

This is the 6th post out of my 10 post series of my videos on my 10th book – SQL Basics. Today will show the importance of data and information.

You can get that in Paperback (USA) and Kindle (Worldwide).

With the SQL Server Management Studio User Interface (SSMS UI), we can create a table by writing code in a query window, or use the “point and click” method. Point and click allows us to create a table without writing any code ourselves. It is much easier to send someone the code script to accomplish a task with SQL Server than it is to send step-by-step instructions on how to point and click their way to accomplish the same task. For this reason, code script is the most common method used to consistently and reliably deploy new databases and objects the exact same way on many systems.

It is much faster to run code that has already been written and tested by someone else than it is to accurately and consistently navigate the user interface. There are times when creating long constructions of code is faster with the SSMS UI than it is to write out each line of code by hand. In addition, some people simply prefer to point and click their way to creating objects in SQL Server.

SQL in Sixty Seconds Video

We have attempted to explain the same subject in simple words over in following video.

Action Item

Get the book for yourself and your friend. This is just a reference everyone must have it.

Read the related blog post: SQL Basics: SQL Code Generators – Day 6 of 10

Available in Paperback (USA), Kindle (Worldwide) 

Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com)

SQL SERVER – SQL Basics Video: Using Management Studio – SQL in Sixty Seconds #060

This is the 5th post out of my 10 post series of my videos on my 10th book – SQL Basics. Today will show the importance of data and information.

You can get that in Paperback (USA) and Kindle (Worldwide).

By now you have written several queries. This means you have opened SQL Server Management Studio and then opened a query window to write your code. Once it came time to execute your code you can do so by pressing F5 or clicking the Execute button. Management Studio connects to your server and provides you handy tools to manage your databases. You even have the Object Explorer to browse all the parts of your server to see what is present. But what if one of your windows is gone? Or what if you are doing a presentation and the fonts are too small to be seen in the back of the room? You can customize the look and feel of Management Studio to your liking. This blog post will show you how to navigate the common windows in Management Studio.

SQL in Sixty Seconds Video

We have attempted to explain the same subject in simple words over in following video.

Action Item

Get the book for yourself and your friend. This is just a reference everyone must have it.

Read the related blog post: SQL Basics: Using Management Studio – Day 5 of 10

Available in Paperback (USA), Kindle (Worldwide) 

Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com)

SQL SERVER – SQL Basics Video: Code Comments – SQL in Sixty Seconds #059

This is the 4th post out of my 10 post series of my videos on my 10th book – SQL Basics. Today will show the importance of data and information.

You can get that in Paperback (USA) and Kindle (Worldwide).

The amount of effort to type the ‘–‘ signs for a single-line comment increases dramatically as the number of continuous lines to be commented out grows. What if we wanted to disable the last 300 lines of code? Typing ‘/*’ and ‘*/’ signs one time each, is definitely easier than typing the ‘–‘ sign 300 times to achieve the exact same result. Unlike the double hyphen, which can only instruct SQL Server to ignore one line of code at a time, the ‘/*’ ‘*/’ signs (delimiters) are more efficient for multi-line commenting as there can be an infinite number of lines of code between the opening and closing delimiters.

SQL in Sixty Seconds Video

We have attempted to explain the same subject in simple words over in following video.

Action Item

Get the book for yourself and your friend. This is just a reference everyone must have it.

Read the related blog post: SQL Basics: Code Comments – Day 4 of 10

Available in Paperback (USA), Kindle (Worldwide) 

Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com)

SQL SERVER – SQL Basics Video: Joining Tables – SQL in Sixty Seconds #058

This is the 3rd post out of my 10 post series of my videos on my 10th book – SQL Basics. Today will show the importance of data and information.

You can get that in Paperback (USA) and Kindle (Worldwide).

An INNER JOIN clause allows us to join multiple tables in a single query, although it requires a specific condition in order for it to work correctly. We must ensure that the INNER JOIN statement has two tables with at least one common or overlapping field. We already know the Employee and Location tables share a common field (LocationID). The relationship is between Employee.LocationID and Location.LocationID, so we instruct SQL Server that the INNER JOIN is on this field and voila! We have combined two tables into one result set.

SQL in Sixty Seconds Video

We have attempted to explain the same subject in simple words over in following video.

Action Item

Get the book for yourself and your friend. This is just a reference everyone must have it.

Read the related blog post: SQL Basics: Joining Tables – Day 3 of 10

Available in Paperback (USA), Kindle (Worldwide) 

Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com)

SQL SERVER – SQL Basics Video: Running SQL Code – SQL in Sixty Seconds #057

This is the 2nd post out of my 10 post series of my videos on my 10th book – SQL Basics. Today will show the importance of data and information.

You can get that in Paperback (USA) and Kindle (Worldwide).

When we run SQL code, it is often a series of SQL statements created by someone else. Still we are often tasked with adding to the code to customize it for our system or testing the code and making suggestions. For this reason the SQL Admin must know basic SQL coding skills. This section will focus on the most common types of queries. If being great at all types of queries is important to you, then we recommend a deeper study with the Joes 2 Pros SQL Queries series starting with Volume 1 for beginners and work through to Volume 5.

Of course, as shown in the two earlier queries in the video, we can put square brackets around any table. In fact, the code generated automatically by SQL Server always creates these delimiters for every object in the database. The only time we must use the square bracket delimiters is when table names are separated by a space, have the same name as a SQL Server keyword (bad idea), or are otherwise named in a way that is not obvious or easily interpreted by SQL Server.

SQL in Sixty Seconds Video

We have attempted to explain the same subject in simple words over in following video.

Action Item

Get the book for yourself and your friend. This is just a reference everyone must have it.

Read the related blog post: SQL Basics: Running SQL Code – Day 2 of 10

Available in Paperback (USA), Kindle (Worldwide) 

Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com)